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My most burning curiosity…

JJohnston015

New member
It's to avoid confusion with the German "nein", or "no", but I have a hard time thinking of a circumstance where somebody would be saying a string of numbers in English, turn German just long enough to say "no", then turn back into an English speaker and continue.
 

Plague

Active member
I have a hard time thinking of a circumstance where somebody would be saying a string of numbers in English, turn German just long enough to say "no", then turn back into an English speaker and continue.
That's linear thinking. You have to imagine the occasions where some of a transmission is lost, broken up, stepped on, etc, so the context becomes blurry.
So a pilot in Germany might ask for something and simultaneously another asks for something else. The controller only hears one of them and his reply is a bit distorted but "nine/nein" is heard by both pilots.
How old is the controller's wife? :unsure:
 

Zeede

Administrator
Staff member
It's to avoid confusion with the German "nein", or "no", but I have a hard time thinking of a circumstance where somebody would be saying a string of numbers in English, turn German just long enough to say "no", then turn back into an English speaker and continue.
Do you have a source for this? It doesn't logically make any sense to me for them to be worried about a single word in German.
 

Roichi

Active member
As a german it does not make any sense either. ;)
Phonetic numbers as well as any voice over radio communication come from the early ages of radios communication. There was way more static, distortions and other things, so to ensure a quick and correct understanding some numbers and ways to speak things are changes to increase the chance of getting the message through even if the transmission is somewhat distorted.
Speaking three as tree gives you a shaper beginning and makes it better understandable. Niner is similar understandable due to the ending.
So even if some parts of the words are scrambled you will get the meaning.
And for the letters you have the ICAO alphabet which works the same way. Just try it and find the unique things to every letter.

The principle is used in every phonetic alphabet.
In German we use zwo instead of zwei for the number two as zwei and drei (two and three) almost sound the same. Especially if the first part is blocked.
 
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