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Is there really a difference in how Carrier-qualified aviators land Commercial Airlines, as

804Hokie

New member
In my days in Army (most of which was in the NGs), we often discussed whether you could tell the commercial pilot had flown for the Navy or not. This was purely based on whether the landings were hard; i.e. suggesting experience landing on carriers.

Though these discussions were mostly just for kicks, is there a way you can discern an aviator with carrier experience from others?
 

Clabington

New member
When I was in USAF, we used to fly charter in/out of Nellis on ATA or Atlas. ATA I think, but it's been a long time ago. One of the pilots was ex navy and would pound it in so hard and hit the brakes to make the first off ramp to our terminal Usually on Friday afternoon. I think I said Atlas in another post since I flew on their charters a fair bit. One of the planes had sign at entrance that it was the D. B. Cooper plane. They used 727s exclusively at the time, which is still one of my favorite trash haulers.
 

Odomclif

New member
In my days in Army (most of which was in the NGs), we often discussed whether you could tell the commercial pilot had flown for the Navy or not. This was purely based on whether the landings were hard; i.e. suggesting experience landing on carriers.

Though these discussions were mostly just for kicks, is there a way you can discern an aviator with carrier experience from others?
Not really. The pilots are trying to land as smoothly as possible, Sometimes they have to land hard because of the conditions.
 

321Captain

New member
I was an S-3B pilot in the Navy. The landings were designed to be made at about 500 FPM. That would jar your teeth in a civilian jet aircraft. When I would fly back to the beach, I would flare to land and try to grease it in just like any other pilot. Flying for the airlines now, you always take some measure of pride at a smooth landing.
 

Siris

Active member
Had an instructor who was a retired F-4 instructor in the navy. When he landed they were as smooth as could be. Only bit that stood out was he hated my 172 because the slowest thing he had flown prior was his Bonanza.
 

321Captain

New member
Yep. Pilots take on the role of whatever their job is right? If you need to smack in in, you do it, and if being smooth and gentle is the call, you do that. Flying slow does kind of suck, but if you are just out flying and don’t need to be anywhere, then it’s nice to be in hover mode and just enjoy the view.
 

Buffalo Merkis

New member
I know this seems a little out of the way, but #1 love this video. #2 about halfway through you see a brief recreation of Swordfish taking off to go after Bismarck. I just cant imagine how it feels to take off in a 1920s era string bag with a torpedo and try your best to find the target, attack it and get back to your carrier and actually score a meaningful hit disabling Bismarck's rudder. also #3, at 4:40 there's a stern looking admiral that sort of looks like it could be Kelsey's dad :D

 
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