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Helicopter questions!

affinity4aviation

Active member
You learn British expressions living in Europe. English is my first of six languages, some of which are similar. I'm gob-smacked by funny assumptions! My dad says to Never Assume, better to ask than to assume!
 
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affinity4aviation

Active member
Six? Do you ever get mixed up?
Sometimes a word comes to you in a different language, yes. Swedish and Norwegian are similar. Danish is similar but sounds guttural, "like having potatoes in your mouth" is the Scandanavian joke. Anyone who knows many languages forgets words or you need to focus to think of it in a certain language, like using a rolodex in your brain. I was fortunate to learn by living in the countries which makes it much easier as you are immersed. My dad is from Norway, so he spoke Swedish and Norwegian at home sometimes. Everyone in Scandanavia and in most of Europe speaks many languages, so it's unimpressive. They need it to do business in English and communicate with neighboring countries. It's mostly Americans that don't learn other languages unless it's required, a shortcoming in schools and myopic. Many kids over there know 4 languages by age 12.
 
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Plague

Well-known member
It's mostly Americans that don't learn other languages unless it's required!
Brits are bad too.
It's our own fault. Britain made half the world 'British' ... ish, then the US took brought aviation and Hollywood to the masses. So for any non-English/American speaker the choice of second language is pretty much pre-set at English/American ... third choice and beyond optional.

But how the heck do English/American speakers decide what to learn as a second language? (I guess in the US Spanish is maybe useful. Chinese (à la Firefly) perhaps for future proofing?)
 

affinity4aviation

Active member
Brits are bad too.
It's our own fault. Britain made half the world 'British' ... ish, then the US took brought aviation and Hollywood to the masses. So for any non-English/American speaker the choice of second language is pretty much pre-set at English/American ... third choice and beyond optional.

But how the heck do English/American speakers decide what to learn as a second language? (I guess in the US Spanish is maybe useful. Chinese (à la Firefly) perhaps for future proofing?)
Yes. Spanish is a necessity in some places to get hired esp. in San Diego, esp. in medicine, and in other parts of CA. People often pick a language they like the sound of, like beautiful French or Italian, or one of a country they want in to visit. Pacific Rim languages are good for business + are required in many Masters programs in International Relations, like in Monterey, CA.
I went to Berlitz in NYC at age 12 for 3 months before moving to Denmark, where they speak Danish to you several hours a day and make it fun. It forces you to not have to translate every word and to focus on listening.
 
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Sonerai

Active member
Learned by living in those counties for 7 years due to my dad's job. Swedish + Norwegian are very similar. Danish is similar but sounds gutteral. French I learned in Switz., Brussels + a yr. of college in Paris. Once in a while I forget a word or need to think of it in a certain language. Everyone in Scandanavia + in much of Europe speaks many languages, so it's unimpressive. It's mostly Americans that don't learn other languages unless it's required, which is a shortcoming in our schools.
What do you call a person who speaks 3 languages? Trilingual. What do you call a person who speaks 2 languages? Bilingual. What do you call a person who speaks one language? An American
 

Sonerai

Active member
Yes Spanish is a necessity in some places to get hired. People often pick a language they like the sound of, like French or Italian, or one of a country they want to visit. I had no choice. Pacific Rim languages are good for business. Berlitz NYC age 12 before moving to Denmark. It was like a job.
Hey, just think in a combat zone, A few words of Viet, a few of French, and a few of Latin
 

MsHighAltitude

Administrator
Staff member
I know what spot-on means! English is my first of six languages. I'm gob-smacked by some of these funny assumptions!
I believe Zeede was trying to clarify that Sonerai was saying most search and rescue missions are carried out by the military, because your subsequent comment of "Or 'search + rescue' like people getting lost in a heavy wooded or mountainous area" appears to assume Sonerai was saying most search and rescue missions are for the military. Hence responding with "spot-on" and your respective background seems a bit... odd? Not that anyone doubt you know what the word means. :)
 

Sonerai

Active member
Well I did not mean almost are S and R are for the military. Now during a way, it is different of course
 

Zeede

Administrator
Staff member
Chinese (à la Firefly) perhaps for future proofing?
They did NOT speak Chinese on Firefly. I love the show but every time they try and speak Chinese it makes me want to hurt someone.

According to the behind the scenes footage, they even had a Chinese speaker on set to help. I find it really hard to believe.
 

Plague

Well-known member
They did NOT speak Chinese on Firefly. I love the show but every time they try and speak Chinese it makes me want to hurt someone.

According to the behind the scenes footage, they even had a Chinese speaker on set to help. I find it really hard to believe.
Well, there are several versions of 'Chinese' so it would depend which one they were using.
And in a few centuries time I'd think the Galactic Language would probably have evolved from today's, let's say, Mandarin.
But given Firefly's satirical edge having 'Americans' mangling a non-English language might have been deliberate :) . (Last year in Spain I was trying to show willing and order refreshments in Spanish and was asked to use English instead :ROFLMAO: )
 

Zeede

Administrator
Staff member
Well, there are several versions of 'Chinese' so it would depend which one they were using.
And in a few centuries time I'd think the Galactic Language would probably have evolved from today's, let's say, Mandarin.
But given Firefly's satirical edge having 'Americans' mangling a non-English language might have been deliberate :) . (Last year in Spain I was trying to show willing and order refreshments in Spanish and was asked to use English instead :ROFLMAO: )
They were trying to speak Mandarin. At least, when it didn't sound like some kind of garbled mess.
 
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