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Helicopter questions!

Mr.Plop

Member
Welcome!
  • How hard is the transition from fixed wing?
  • What knowledge or training can you convert?
  • Benefits from starting on a R22 vs R44?
  • Would you recommend going from private to instrument or private to commercial? (how useful or useless would that instrument be?)
  • Do people really pay for turbine training? seems expensive. exp R66 rental.
Hope I filled your bucket
 

RotorCapt

New member
Welcome!
  • How hard is the transition from fixed wing?
  • What knowledge or training can you convert?
  • Benefits from starting on a R22 vs R44?
  • Would you recommend going from private to instrument or private to commercial? (how useful or useless would that instrument be?)
  • Do people really pay for turbine training? seems expensive. exp R66 rental.
Hope I filled your bucket
Hello Mr.Plop and thx!

1. I did the add-on from fixed when I had about 800 hours Comm, Ifr and Multi. Started in a R-22 in S.F. I think that after learning how to hover it was not that bad, of course you need to read up on all the rotor aerodynamics and the Regs.
2. Do not know your background but I think you can use all of it.
3. Its like learning on a Piper Tomahawk, "under power" is a good thing in the beginning teaches you the "right" way. Just my thoughts. Been teaching for about 6000 hours in the 22 and about 4000 hours in the 44 and a lot of other models too.
4. Depends what your end goal is, just for fun and building time as you go, you dont need an Instrument rating, but if you are going Pro I did Pvt, Ifr and then Comm. Killing two birds while approaching your 150 hours and Comm.
5. I did a Turbine transition that I paid for just for fun, but the company that will hire you for your first turbine gig will get you your transition and you getting paid for it.

Hope you got some question answered.
 

Mr.Plop

Member
Hello Mr.Plop and thx!

1. I did the add-on from fixed when I had about 800 hours Comm, Ifr and Multi. Started in a R-22 in S.F. I think that after learning how to hover it was not that bad, of course you need to read up on all the rotor aerodynamics and the Regs.
2. Do not know your background but I think you can use all of it.
3. Its like learning on a Piper Tomahawk, "under power" is a good thing in the beginning teaches you the "right" way. Just my thoughts. Been teaching for about 6000 hours in the 22 and about 4000 hours in the 44 and a lot of other models too.
4. Depends what your end goal is, just for fun and building time as you go, you dont need an Instrument rating, but if you are going Pro I did Pvt, Ifr and then Comm. Killing two birds while approaching your 150 hours and Comm.
5. I did a Turbine transition that I paid for just for fun, but the company that will hire you for your first turbine gig will get you your transition and you getting paid for it.

Hope you got some question answered.
seems like a neat certificate to have, thanks!
 

Fuzzy

New member
To me the best way to learn to fly helicopters is with the Army. For civilian schools find one where the primary trainer is either a Schweitzer on a Bell aircraft. It’s only my personal opinion, but not the Robinson.
Airplane to helicopter will be a lot harder than helicopter to airplane. The control touch in an airplane is like using your whole arm where in a helicopter you use just your fingers. When I went through flight school I was told the following. “The amount of pressure on the helicopter cyclic is like playing with mama’s ni****. Anything more than that is a violent maneuver.” My instructor said he was told this and he passed it on to his students and I passed it on to my students. I’ve had different airplane pilots fly with me. The easiest ones to teach were the guys that flew “Heavies”. They had to be smooth on the controls when they flew for troop drops or cargo drops. The worst were the single engine pilots. Good luck learning to fly the hello. They are fun.
 
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