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ATC spoken language questions

Plague: Your astute comment: 321captain has mentioned that expectation of the runway, + not being lined up with the correct one. I'd like to hear what they say when they realize it! It's refreshing that pilots admit to mistakes + quickly correct them + that redundancy/check lists do work!
 
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I totally agree.


Heh, this brings me to my pet peeve which is non-native English speakers who should not have gotten the "Speaks English" requirement checked off. As the parents of immigrants I *REALLY* get pissed when there are pilots on SoCal Approach who speak barely comprehensible English. There was one Japanese helicopter student at KREI that was completely incomprehensible.

With so many family members who do not speak English as a native I know that it is extremely easy to "parrot" ATC calls and make it seem like you know what you're being told to do, when in fact, you probably only understand half of what was said to you. It's SO UNSAFE.
[/QUOTE Does ATC report them to FAA, to ensure their airline requires them to get more language training + get recertified? FAA knows this happens, yet do nothing to correct it? Waiting for another Air Disasters episode, like the Columbian pilots who ran out of fuel + never declared an emergency, before they put an updated mandate in place? Some things in commercial aviation make no sense; like flying despite a serious documented maintenance issue + then the plane crashes.
 
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Roichi

Active member
To be fluent, you need to hear it in the language being spoken to you, and understand in from what they are saying to you in that language. Am I right? I know that some of you on this forum speak and write in English as a second language. By the way, I wanted to learn French, not for tourism and street signs, but because I met and dated a French girl on some of my layovers 😬
Well I just can add from my experience.
I learned english in school more or less. I was good in reading and writing, not so much in speaking.
The way I really learned english was at my job I did while studing at the university. I worked in an international team so you had to speak english. In the morning with Taiwan, Japan, China moving over to India then Ukraine, Britain and in the evening the USA and Argentina. So everyday I was forced to use it and hear different accents. At the same time I started to really view films and TV series in english. And to read english books from time to time.
It was a gradual process.

Now I have the problem that sometimes I do not even know which language I listen to or reading a text in. That sometimes makes it difficult to get back to it, or tell/translate it for someone else.
Kind of weird.

I also had french in school, but that is a different chapter. Although I must say I still got some interestingly good skills in reading an hearing french. I usually get teh overall meaning of a french conversation and I can read it to a good degree.

What helps me is that english, french, spanish, italian and so on are all based on latin and therefore have lots of communalities (english also has strong german influences). Some words are different, but most are similar. If you chuck grammar out of the window you most likely can read simple texts like signs and understand them. I can most of the time. Very helpful on vacation.

All in all practice is what you need. In any craft.
 
(y)
Well I just can add from my experience.
I learned English in school more or less. I was good in reading and writing, not so much in speaking.
The way I really learned English was at my job I did while studying at the university. I worked in an international team so you had to speak English. In the morning with Taiwan, Japan, China moving over to India then Ukraine, Britain and in the evening the USA and Argentina. So everyday I was forced to use it and hear different accents. At the same time I started to really view films and TV series in English. And to read English books from time to time.
It was a gradual process.

Now I have the problem that sometimes I do not even know which language I listen to or reading a text in. That sometimes makes it difficult to get back to it, or tell/translate it for someone else.
Kind of weird.

I also had French in school, but that is a different chapter. Although I must say I still got some interestingly good skills in reading an hearing French. I usually get the overall meaning of a French conversation, and I can read it to a good degree.

What helps me is that english, french, spanish, italian and so on are all based on Latin, and therefore have lots of communalities (english also has strong german influences). Some words are different, but most are similar. If you chuck grammar out of the window you most likely can read simple texts like signs and understand them. I can most of the time. Very helpful on vacation.

All in all practice is what you need. In any craft.
Your background is extremely interesting + U R a pilot too! What did you study/where? In Denmark they had MASH on tv + it helped them learn English!
 
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Roichi

Active member
(y)

Your background is extremely interesting + U R a pilot too! What did you study/where? In Denmark they had MASH on tv + it helped them learn English!
I am not a pilot. I am an aerospace engineer.
So I studied the design of aircraft, their systems, how to design these, human factors, some engine courses and aerodynamics and lots of other stuff.
The university is the Technical University Berlin.

And I did a lot of other stuff besides studying. Most of all working to pay the bills and some political engagement.
 
I am not a pilot. I am an aerospace engineer.
So I studied the design of aircraft, their systems, how to design these, human factors, some engine courses and aerodynamics and lots of other stuff.
The university is the Technical University Berlin.

And I did a lot of other stuff besides studying. Most of all working to pay the bills and some political engagement.
That is amazing; you are erudite + talented! Airplane design is fascinating; you've had quite a career. Heard of Chromalloy? An aerospace engineer I met designs jet engine parts for that company. They save the airlines + the military lots of $ in parts.
U speak Deutsch! Was on a tourist bus in East Berlin prior to the wall removal. Check point Charlie made me diaphoretic; frightening guards.
 
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